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Introduction to Doing Research

For those new or returning to research, this guide will help you to plan your research projects and use the library more effectively.

Citation Help

After you finish researching and writing the paper,  there's still one thing left to do.... cite the articles you found using the research skills outlined in this guide. 

No problem! The library has many resources to help you figure out citations and take you step-by-step through formatting your paper, citations, and bibliography according to various citations styles, including

Citation Generators

These websites will assist you in building citations for your bibliographies. Always check your citations against a style manual to make sure they are correct.

Mendeley Citation Manager

Mendeley is a reference/citation manager with web-based, desktop, and mobile versions. You can sync your citation library between these different versions and across different devices.

Mendeley Institutional Edition (MIE).  Any Webster University or Eden Seminary user who creates a free Mendeley account using your Webster or Eden email address through the Library website should be automatically enrolled in the MIE, which provides:

  • 100 GB of personal library space
  • 100 GB of shared library space
  • Create unlimited number of groups with up to 100 members each
  • More tools for maximum resource sharing!

What is an Annotated Bibliography?

An annotated bibliography is a list of cited sources from books, articles, documents, or websites. Some annotated bibliography summarize a source and some evaluate or assess a source. Your professor will specify the type and citation style of annotated bibliography they would like.

Help with Annotated Bibliography

Sample Annotated Bibliography Entries

The following example uses APA style (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, 2010) for the journal citation:

Waite, L. J., Goldschneider, F. K., & Witsberger, C. (1986). Nonfamily living and the erosion of traditional family orientations among young adults. American Sociological Review, 51, 541-554.
The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

This example uses MLA style (MLA Handbook, 8th edition, 2016) for the journal citation:

Waite, Linda J., et al. "Nonfamily Living and the Erosion of Traditional Family Orientations Among Young Adults." American Sociological Review, vol. 51, no. 4, 1986, pp. 541-554.
The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

 

The content in this box was created by 

Olin Library Reference
Research & Learning Services
Cornell University Library
Ithaca, NY, USA

And is used with permission.